Thymelord

I am Captain Tightpants

Anonymous asked: $100 is a lot of money for a single page.

jamaligle:

postcardsfromspace:

mooncalfe:

himteckerjam:

katyfarina:

fauxboy:

how much is a loaf of bread? hm? $3? $5? 

At my local grocery store, bread is about $4.50 for a decent size italian loaf. If I make $7.25 and hour, that means I’d have to work 37 and a half minutes for a Loaf of bread.

but hey, that’s not so bad right? Work two hours and you’ll have a sandwich, eh?

Oh hey, turns out I also need toilet paper, rice, chicken, some veggies, a can of soup, and some cereal. (to name a few basic groceries one might need on a budget) we’ll round those things down to $25 just to make the math easier.

at $7.25 an hour I’ll have to work about 3 and a half hours for basic groceries.

That doesn’t include bills or gas or all the other groceries I need, That’s ONE quick trip to the store and I already have to work half a day just for that.

You don’t understand Anon, my pages could take HOURS if not DAYS. Between the sketching, inking, colouring, lettering, and finishing it’s taken at least a full two day’s work if not longer for each page.

I have a job that pays me beans, I cannot afford to post more pages a week without compensation. I literally cannot afford to do that. Not to mention the idea that art is only worth minimum wage cheapens the amount of work and effort that goes into producing it. I should be making WELL ABOVE minimum wage for my art via page count and commissions but it’s this damn “deviant art” mindset that makes people feel like they’re being swindled for paying a livable wage to artists. It’s rude and childish and I ask that you please stop considering artists as less worthy of affording a normal life.

You can either pay me what I ask for what you want or stop complaining about what I already give you for free.

image

I cannot fucking stand people who tell illustrators that something they produce is too expensive.

Yall motherfuckers want cheap? Go get some paper, get a fucking pencil and then draw it your motherfucking selves because nobody freelancing on the internet who hasn’t even half made it in the illustration world is charging you ANYTHING close to industry pricing even when some of us are as good if not better. Why? Because of people like Anon. Your name must be out there and known to charge anything close to what your time and skill is worth. Yet still? You are paying for my effort, my time, my blood, sweat and tears and a lifetime of learning my trade.

A cheap page for yo ass is a piece of paper I haven’t touched yet.

/rant

(As a freelancer I cannot staaaaaaaaaaaaaand people who pull this dogshit.)

$100 is pretty cheap for a page.

Basic math, for Anon up there: Break that $100 down into an hourly rate. Factor in materials. Factor in skill and schooling and experience. Bear in mind that a page rate *at all* means there’s a good chance it’s work-for-hire, which means that $100 a page might be all the artist gets, ever.

And then, when you’ve done that math, think about what that means in terms of how few comics artists make a living hourly wage.

Want a pro artist, anon? Pay them like a fucking pro.

I’d like to add the a professional of any stripe has the duty to themselves, and the right to charge a rate based on his skill level and the work he or she puts in.

Anonymous asked: hello! i wanted to ask, i wonder if you can help, what are the things to do and steps to follow when you want to publish a comic for the very first time. i more or less finished writing a scenario and started thinking on how to put it on paper and draw it etc. and i don’t know how far i must go and do it before i can present it to some publishing company. do i have to complete it entirely and finish it, or just the rough/draft of it is enough? if you have any advices i’d gladly hear it!! thanks!

blackyjunkgallery:

yeah sure, here’s some little advice i learn.

When you want to propose a project, imagine that you show to the publisher a trailer of your work. By trailer i mean you have to charm the publisher quickly.

Basically you need :

-The pitch: i a few line (5 to 10) you have to resume your story in the main line, by showing how it’s a good story and to let some mysteries to create some interest.
this part is very important, you have to catch the intention very quickly ( the trailer effect thing that i talked before).

-5 Pages finalised: it have to be finished, colour, bubble and text. It have to show what the reader will see in the book. My advice is to take a nice scene of your story (I doesn’t need to be le first scene), you have to show your drawing skill.

Aaaand that’s it.

Sure you can add some fews rough more, or a script.
But i worked at a publisher, and you have to imagine that someday they received, 20, 30 maybe more project.
They can’t read every script, or a files of 40 pages. A good project proposition is short and impacting.

Hope it will you, if you want more informations don’t hesitate to ask.

jofesinen:

The nazi-party called “The Swedish Party” was in Malmö, Sweden today (and had a permit from the police, WTF). About 2000 people were there to peacefully let them know that they are not welcome here.

Singing and shouting, the demonstrators were loud, but as peaceful you can be when there are nazis invading our city.

The police respond by running an unarmed, non-threatening person over with a bus.

The police respond by riding over people who did nothing but try to let the nazis know that they are not welcome here. 10-15 cops on horses riding over people, continuously, over and over again.

A nazi tried to pull of a woman’s hijab, hit her, the cops saw but did nothing.

People are lying bloody on the streets, when people come over to help, the cops tell them no.

The cops have blood on their hands, and they are now, after giving the nazis a ride away from there, standing outside the emergency room to “protect people from violent activists”.

To everyone thinking Sweden is an equal country: no, it’s not. Nazis get free rides from the police after they propagate their disgusting message, and innocent people who just wants equality are being run over by the cops.

This is not the first time this happens. In the 20s, Swedish military opened fire into a group of unarmed demonstrators.

Last year, a similar thing to what happened today happened in Stockholm.

This year, at similar demonstrations, cops have been running people over, beating them with batons and arresting people for no good reason.

This spring, on international women’s day, happy demonstrators move from a peaceful and happy demonstration to a party, and on the way, several of them are stabbed by nazis. The police and media call this a “fight between different activists”, while nazis were carrying knives, and feminists were stabbed in the back and beaten up so badly that one of them had to stay in the hospital for months.

Sweden is not equal. Europe is not equal. The US isn’t equal. It isn’t peaceful. It isn’t democratic. They are taking democracy away from us. We can’t let them.

(via flaneurziggy)

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.
It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.
Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.
A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.
Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:
Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+
Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 
If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 
BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.

It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.

Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.

A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.

Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:

  • Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
  • Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
  • Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+

Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 

If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 

BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. 
The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

(via flaneurziggy)

juliedillon:

juliedillon:

Imagined Realms: Book 1
I have launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund the first issue of Imagined Realms, an annual art publication featuring positive and diverse representations of women in fantasy and science fiction. Each book will feature 10 exclusive and new illustrations created by me specifically for the book.  

Available for purchase are the printed books, 6”x8” and 11”x14” print packs that have all 10 illustrations, limited edition fine art giclees, and a downloadable process video showing my digital painting method. 
Please check it out and spread the word! 

Imagined Realms has hit the $25,000 stretch goal!! That means everyone’s print orders will now come with an additional thank-you postcard, featuring an exclusive new picture that I’m making which will only be printed on the cards and never posted online. The next goal at $30k will give everyone who has pledged at least $15 a 2nd downloadable video that shows my digital painting process, this time of my Downtime piece. 
Imagined Realms still has 16 days to go on kickstarter, and I will hopefully have a few more interesting announcements soon! 

juliedillon:

juliedillon:

Imagined Realms: Book 1

I have launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund the first issue of Imagined Realms, an annual art publication featuring positive and diverse representations of women in fantasy and science fiction. Each book will feature 10 exclusive and new illustrations created by me specifically for the book.  

Available for purchase are the printed books, 6”x8” and 11”x14” print packs that have all 10 illustrations, limited edition fine art giclees, and a downloadable process video showing my digital painting method. 

Please check it out and spread the word! 

Imagined Realms has hit the $25,000 stretch goal!! That means everyone’s print orders will now come with an additional thank-you postcard, featuring an exclusive new picture that I’m making which will only be printed on the cards and never posted online. The next goal at $30k will give everyone who has pledged at least $15 a 2nd downloadable video that shows my digital painting process, this time of my Downtime piece. 

Imagined Realms still has 16 days to go on kickstarter, and I will hopefully have a few more interesting announcements soon! 

Top